International Engineering Education Conference - Turkey's Vision 2023 Conference Series - Atılım University

Invited Speakers

Prof.Dr. Lueny Morell

Prof.Dr. Lueny Morell

Hewlett-Packard Laboratories Program Manager
Strategy and Innovation Office
Palo Alto, CA, USA

Lueny Morell, M.S., P.E., is Program Manager in the Strategy and Innovation Office staff of Hewlett Packard Laboratories (HPL) in Palo Alto, California. She is responsible for facilitating external research collaborations for HPL and lead initiatives focused on R&D talent development, collaborating with external partners (government entities and other corporate labs) to pursue strategies and initiatives of benefit to the research community. In the past, she was in charge of developing engineering/science curriculum innovation initiatives worldwide in support of HPL research and technology areas and former director of HPL University Relations for Latin America and the Caribbean in charge of building research and education collaborations with universities throughout the region. Before joining HP, Lueny was full professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico - Mayagüez (UPRM) where she held positions at the Campus and UPR system level, including director of Campus Research Center. Recipient of the 2006 US National Academy of Engineering Bernard M. Gordon award, her work in curriculum, research, accreditation and economic development activities has been published in more than 60 papers, book chapters and journals. She is a licensed engineer, ABET reviewer and member of various national and international boards including the US National Science Foundation International Science and Engineering Advisory Committee, ASEE International Advisory Committee and President of the International Federation of Engineering Education Societies.

The Imperative to Reform Engineering Education

Lueny Morell

Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Program Manager, Strategy and Innovation Office
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Abstract
The evolution of the world economy, new business strategies and globalization are forcing countries and regions develop approaches to enhance their economies to better compete worldwide. Higher education, science, technology, engineering and innovation play a fundamental role in the creation of wealth, economic development and in the improvement of the quality of life for all citizens. This presentation will address the need to reform/innovate engineering education and capacity building as key foundations that enhance national/regional economic development strategies. It will discuss the skills and competencies needed in graduates as well as the various issues that engineering/technology education leaders need to address.

 

 

Prof.Dr. Meral AKSU

Prof.Dr. Meral AKSU

Middle East Technical University,
Faculty of Education,
Ankara, TURKEY

Prof.Dr. Meral AKSU received her B.S. from Middle East Technical University (METU) Mathematics Department, M.S. and Ph.D. from Hacettepe University in the area of “Curriculum Development and Evaluation”. She served as the assistant Department Chair and Department Chair in the Department of Educational Sciences at Faculty of Education, METU. She has been the Dean of the Faculty of Education at METU since 2001. She has given several seminars on effective teaching, curriculum development and student evaluation. She has also worked in several projects on education. Her main teaching and research interests are: teacher education, curriculum development and evaluation, mathematics education, problem solving, factors affecting achievement, school effectiveness and improvement, higher education and staff development/professional training.

How should we educate “effective” professionals?

Meral Aksu

Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Education
Ankara, TURKEY

 

Abstract
The changes and developments in knowledge area, society, technology, and learner characteristics should be reflected in a well planned curriculum. The success of any curriculum is widely dependent on whom and how it is implemented. This talk will mainly concentrate on expectations, student characteristics and curriculum implementation.

 

 

Prof. Dr. Hasan U. Akay

Prof. Dr. Hasan U. Akay

Atilim University
Ankara, Turkey

Dr. Hasan U. Akay has joined Atilim University in March 2010 as Provost. Prior to that, he has been with IUPUI (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis) for thirty years as professor of mechanical engineering, where he also held administrative positions as department chair and associate dean.  He was the founding director of a popular multidisciplinary undergraduate research program at IUPUI (www.muri.iupui.edu) from 2005 till 2009.  He has over thirty-five years of research and teaching experience in development of computational algorithms for solution of multiphysics problems, including parallel and grid computing algorithms for large-scale problems with broad range of applications in fluid dynamics, solid dynamics, and heat and mass transfer using finite element and finite volume methods.  His primary activities in these areas include research, teaching, development, and technical consulting.  Dr. Akay holds a B.S. degree from Middle East Technical University at Ankara in 1967; M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from University of Texas at Austin in 1969 and 1974, respectively.  He has conducted numerous research projects funded by various government and private agencies.  Dr. Akay has received a number of professional honors at IUPUI, including chancellor’s professor, distinguished mentor, outstanding leadership, outstanding research professor, and teaching excellence awards.  He is a Fellow Member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Senior Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and Member of the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE).  

The Need for Simulation-Based Engineering and Science Emphasis in Engineering Education

Hasan U. Akay

Atilim University
Ankara, TURKEY

 

Abstract
The scientists and engineers of this century will be expected to tackle problems of unprecedented complexities defining the natural phenomena, which can only be solved with computer simulations.  While the analytical solutions of these problems will not be possible due to complexities of the equations defining them, it will also be very difficult, if not impossible, to conduct experiments for most of them.  As indicated in the 2004 report of NAE (National Academy of Engineers), the engineers of 2020 will not only need much broader education to handle the complex world problems, they also have to possess stronger analytical skills to meet the demands of emerging complex systems encompassing life sciences, nanosciences, optical science, and materials science.  Many will be simulation based.  These simulations need algorithm complexities and computing powers of huge magnitudes in speed and memory.  As an answer, Simulation-Based Engineering and Science (SBE&S) has emerged during the recent years as an indispensable part of scientific and engineering investigations.  Development of algorithms for SBE&S can be accomplished by interdisciplinary computational science and engineering programs, which are usually dispersed into various disciplines.  However most of these programs are of graduate level, where most undergraduates are not exposed to these thus come to graduate programs unprepared. 
Parallel to this, scientific and engineering organizations in many developed countries have been investing heavily on building scientific and engineering computing environments for simulations called computing grids for shared usage of resources.  Examples are TeraGrid (www.teragrid.org) in USA and TR-Grid (www.grid.org.tr) in Turkey.  These grids are formed by connecting the computer systems at geographically distant locations with fiber optics networks and are administered by some alliances.  Mostly targeted for massive data sharing, research, and development, such grid alliances are designed to form community of researchers and educators sharing the hardware and software resources, expertise, and knowledge for scientific discoveries.  While the parallel computing algorithms developed by subdividing a large problem into smaller parts and solving each part concurrently on distributed computer systems have long been used, a new computing paradigm called grid computing has emerged during the recent years to harness the enormous power of such computing grids.  This has brought many opportunities as well as challenges.  In spite of these investments, utilization of these resources among engineers is still lacking.  Although the impact of SBE&S is enormous on engineering and scientific discoveries in several areas, most engineers and scientists are not adequately trained to use and/or develop these tools effectively.  The core expertise needed for development and utilization of such simulation algorithms are based on mathematics, science, and computer programming.  A panel from the World Technology Center (WTEC) in 2007 assessed that the inadequate education and training of the next generation of computational scientists threatens global as well as U.S. growth of simulation-based engineering and science.  The panel found concern that students use codes primarily as black boxes, with only a very small fraction of students learning proper algorithm and software development, in particular with an eye towards open-source or community code development. 
In this talk, we will make recommendations to engineering programs to increase this emphasis during the early years of engineering educations, to prepare engineers for current and future challenges.  We will also review some model undergraduate and graduate programs in this area.


 

Prof. Dr. Hasan U. Akay

Prof. Dr. Adnan Akay

Bilkent University
Mechanical Engineering Department Turkey

Adnan Akay joined Bilkent University on January 1, 2009 as Vice President and the founding head of Mechanical Engineering Department. He joined Bilkent from the U.S. National Science Foundation where he was the director of the Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation Division. Between 1992 and 2005 Dr. Akay was the head of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University where he currently holds the title of Lord Professor of Engineering. Prior to joining Carnegie Mellon, he was on the faculty at Wayne State University, where he last held the DeVlieg Chair in Engineering, and prior to that he was with the National Institutes of Health. He has held visiting appointments at several universities and continues to collaborate with colleagues at the University of Rome "La Sapienza," and Institut National des Sciences Appliquées (INSA) de Lyon in France. He also serves as an advisor to numerous companies and universities. Adnan Akay’s research area is in acoustics, vibrations and friction with applications ranging from submarines to aircraft and automotive brakes and most recently to haptics. He has been recognized with awards including the Per Brüel Gold Medal in Acoustics and Noise Control in 2005 from ASME. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Acoustical Society of America.

 

Engineering Education in the 21st Century

Adnan Akay

Bilkent University
Ankara, TURKEY

 

Abstract

Discussions on engineering education continue around the world as technology has been recognized as an inevitable part of modernity and economic development. In particular, emphasis placed on engineering in the most populous nations of the world has raised additional questions about whether engineering education in the western nations provide the necessary added value. Additional efforts to provide global experience to students as well as to fulfill the needs for graduate students have brought many representatives of western universities to Turkey and other countries. Notwithstanding these discussions and conferences, the education enterprise needs re-examination. This presentation will address some of the reasons why there is a need for re-examination and briefly describe advances external to engineering but highly relevant to education.


 

Paul  Kontogiorgios

Paul Kontogiorgis

IT Services Curiculum (ITSC)
Program Director,

Chicagoland CAS Leader SSME Advocate


Paul Kontogiorgis is the Program Director of IBM's IT Service Curriculum (ITSC) program in the Software Group. ITSC was founded five years ago in the Research Division, and now has been incorporated in over 220 universities worldwide.  Paul was recently appointed as the head of the Chicagoland Center for Advanced Studies (CAS).Paul Kontogiorgis has been with IBM for 10 years, holding multiple positions including IT Architect, IT Consultant, and IT Project Manager for multiple Fortune 500 companies in multiple industries and sectors.  Since founding the ITSC Program, Paul has visited over 20 countries including the Czech Republic, Poland, and Thailand to meet with multiple ministers of education and tier 1 universities, to assist their local strategic plans for the future of their education policies. Paul Kontogiorgis earned his BS in Computer Science from DePaul University in Chicago, and serves on multiple university advisory boards worldwide.  His background includes political science, civil engineering, and classical piano. 

 

In Demand Skills In An On Demand World

Paul Kontogiorgis

IT Services Curiculum (ITSC) Program Director,
Chicagoland CAS Leader SSME Advocate

 

Abstract

There has been a huge gap between academia and industry over the past decade which has lead to a vast disconnection in the world.  There are many academic areas including, IT Service Management, and Service Science, which have also suffered in terms of research for improving the manner in which services are being studied and improved.  A need has grown to create updates to existing curricula and develop research which requires a partnership, or ecosystem, between academia, industry, and the catalyst represented by local government.  Today, we will show how IBM has led these discussions and initiatives for the past decade around the globe, to help further the message and extend the existing relationships with Turkey.

 

 

Paul  Kontogiorgios

Prof. Dr. Oral Büyüköztürk

Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA USA

Professor Oral Büyüköztürk is a graduate of Istanbul Technical University, Civil Engineering Department and received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University. Following several years of experience in the nuclear power technology industry and after serving as adjunct professor at Brown University, he joined the faculty of Civil Engineering Department at M.I.T. in 1976. Since then, he has been actively involved in research in a broad spectrum of engineering topics and engineering education. His research interests followed the critical development needs in engineering covering structures, mechanics and materials, infrastructure engineering, nuclear power technology, off-shore structures, innovative and high-performance materials and systems. As head of the structures and materials division of the M.I.T. Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, he ran large research, development and education programs such as MIT-TUB cooperative program and a large scale industry consortium including 13 major energy corporations. He has been active in engineering education with an intense international involment in devoloping innovative education strategies, curriculum development, academic assessement and accreditation. Professor Büyüköztürk is a member of numerous professional societies, has published in excess of 200 technical papers, and has delivered invited and keynote lectures in numerous international conferences around the world. He is a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and Scotland’s Academy of Science and Letters.

 

Challenges in Modern Engineering Education

Oral Büyüköztürk

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department
Cambridge, MA 02139

 

Abstract

As a society, we experience a time of dynamic change with economical growth, rapid technological development, and global economic competitiveness. In this process, engineers play an important role and these changes force the boundaries of engineering to expand. As educators, we need to respond to these changes and challenges. The challenges include growing complexity of systems, uncertainty, and required interdisciplinary foundations of engineering problems. Also, the need for sustainability considering industrializaiton, and environmental degredation as well as increased focus on public safety and security offer tremendous challenges for effective solutions by engineers placing a heavy demand on engineering education. Understanding these challenges, problems and designing sustainable solutions will require multi-disciplinary and innovative methods to applied science and engineering problems. In this context, our approach to engineering education will require fundamental understanding of these changes and challenges and integrating knowledge from different disciplines for creative solutions. In this presentation, we will focus on the challenges of modern engineering education with emphasis on the need for an interdisciplinary approach, and describe various engineering education models.